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CURATIOMAGAZINE

December 1, 2016
12 MINUTE READ

Inside La Fabrica

As you fly over Madrid’s international airport, there is a patch of velvet-green playing fields enclosed by a string of road arteries and unending yellowish-brown scrubland. This little oasis is Ciudad Real Madrid, home to the great football club’s training ground and youth academy…

Richard Fitzpatrick, bleacherreport.com

2 MINUTE READ

The Feynman Technique

I will help you learn anything deeper, and faster. The topic, subject, or concept you want to learn doesn’t matter. Pick anything. The Feynman Technique works for everything. Best of all, it’s incredibly simple to implement. The catch: It’s ridiculously humbling…

Shane Parrish, medium.com

9 MINUTE READ

The Story Of Vaccines

The history of inoculation may sound a little dry, but it’s really an epic tale of human trafficking, semi-illicit experimentation, and high explosives. It’s a globe-hopping story that stars harem girls, noblewomen, prisoners, princesses, slaves, and even a witch hunter…

Kiona Smith-Strickland, gizmodo.com

5 MINUTE READ

A Look At Scale

The reason communism or utopianism can work at small scale is because of the tight knit nature of a small group. Think of your family dinner table: Do you need to trade chits to decide who gets to eat how much, or do you need some grand overseer to dole out the potatoes?

Shane Parrish, farnamstreetblog.com

6 MINUTE READ

Hidden Tracks Are Gone

The secret bonus songs and obscure skits were among the few things about an album that couldn’t easily be converted to MP3 or Spotify. Why is that? Simple: When everything’s a file and Siri can dig it up for you if you ask nicely enough, there’s simply nowhere to hide anymore…

Ernie Smith, atlasobscura.com

3 MINUTE READ

Why Mean People Fail

It struck me recently how few of the most successful people I know are mean. There are exceptions, but remarkably few. While there are clearly a lot of mean people out there, there are next to none among the most successful people I know. Are meanness and success inversely correlated?

Paul Graham, paulgraham.com

1 MINUTE READ

Easy Lovin’

Frank Sinatra adored openly and gave not a damn who saw. In the middle of parties, he blurted encomiums of love and appreciation. Public proclamation did not faze him; after all, he sang the same sentiments on records and stages-legendarily making every woman feel that he sang only to her…

Richard Vague, delanceyplace.com

5 MINUTE READ

Jokes Per Minute

I took a dozen U.S. comedies and calculated the average jokes per minute of three episodes of each. By «jokes,» I mean intended jokes, whether or not I, as a viewer, found them funny. In order of highest to lowest average jokes per minute, here are the results…

Talib Visram, theatlantic.com

13 MINUTE READ

The Chessboxers

Chessboxing is exactly what it sounds like: chess but with boxing. Two fighters – usually men, though women have done it – step into a ring with all the pomp and circumstance of the most self-assured professional fighter. The bell rings, and they sit down in the center of the ring…

Chris Stokel-Walker, buzzfeed.com

3 MINUTE READ

Art Makes You Smart

For many education advocates, the arts are a panacea: They supposedly increase test scores, generate social responsibility and turn around failing schools. Most of the supporting evidence, though, does little more than establish correlations between exposure to the arts and certain outcomes…

Brian Kisida, nytimes.com

14 MINUTE READ

Jesus, Meet Jesus

Dr. Rokeach sought and secured a research grant to test a hypothesis, and he began canvassing sanitariums for delusional doppelgängers. Soon he found several suitable subjects: three patients, all in state care, each of whom believed himself to be Jesus Christ. And he saw that it was good…

Alan Bellows, damninteresting.com

November 30, 2016
3 MINUTE READ

The Mirror Effect

The convex glass mirror was a Venetian invention of about 1300. Its rise shaped our idea of the individual. The very act of a person seeing himself in a mirror or being represented in a portrait as the center of attention encouraged him to think of himself in a different way…

Ian Mortimer, laphamsquarterly.org

2 MINUTE READ

Before Helen Keller

Helen Keller is arguably history’s most recognizable woman with a disability – a figure whose education allowed her to overcome being blind, deaf, and mute. But before Helen Keller, there was Laura Bridgman, the first blind and deaf woman who learned to communicate through language…

Erin Blakemore, jstor.org

5 MINUTE READ

Japan’s Mummy Monks

A monk who chose to perform self-mummification, or sokushinbutsu, began by abstaining from grains and cereals, eating only fruits and nuts for one thousand days. He spent this nearly three years meditating and continuing to perform service to the temple and community…

Erika Nesvold, damninteresting.com

4 MINUTE READ

Bird Song Notation

When studying birdsong, contemporary ornithologists use their vision as often as their hearing, picking out unique features of sounds from multicolored smudges they trace in computer windows. This approach owes much to the spectrograph – a technology built in the 1940s to identify warships…

Cara Giaimo, io9.com

3 MINUTE READ

Leather Investigations

If you were a fancy person in the Middle Ages, you might have known how to read. If you were very, very fancy, you might have owned a book. And if that book was fancy, the pages would have been made of a material called uterine vellum. Let’s break that phrase down…

Kate Horowitz, mentalfloss.com

4 MINUTE READ

Art Of Corporate Email

Most work emails are purely defensive missives. They seek to shift effort, hide omissions, or provide cover against future blame. Emails simulate work: Rather than getting something done, you create a futures market for excuses and rationales for not getting them done…

Ian Bogost, theatlantic.com

2 MINUTE READ

Flying The Concorde

Concorde was the most glamorous airliner in the world. But what was it like to fly? I recently discovered some gems from the BBC radio archive that provide a fascinating insight into the aircraft’s development at the time. Apparently, it was «a pilot’s plane, but also a passenger’s plane»…

Jack Stewart, bbc.com

4 MINUTE READ

So Many Senses

Simply defining what we mean by a «sense» leads you down a slippery slope into philosophy. We might argue that a human sense is simply a way for the brain to receive information about the world. If that is the case, then we can claim that there are certainly more than five human senses…

Christian Jarrett, bbc.com

5 MINUTE READ

Aid Is Not Helping

Most development aid is actively harmful. Selling goods for less than production cost is dumping, a business practice condemned as predatory; aid is just dumping with the price set to zero. The horror stories are legion. For example, donated clothes decimate local textile industries…

Jon Evans, techcrunch.com

10 MINUTE READ

Neil Gaiman On Fame

The fantasy writer Neil Gaiman has been wearing the same outfit since 1987. And with his messy dark hair and air of permanent distraction, Gaiman had a personal brand long before people used the phrase. It’s almost enough to overwhelm the man himself. Almost…

Laurie Penny, newrepublic.com

5 MINUTE READ

Geeks For Monarchy

There’s a community of bloggers taking the idea to an extreme: they want to turn the dial way back to the days before the French Revolution. Neoreactionaries believe that while capitalism has advanced humanity over the past couple centuries, democracy has actually done more harm than good…

Klint Finley, techcrunch.com